Do the Questions then response to post 1 and 2

Do the Questions then response to post 1 and 2

Why was Jack Kevorkian so popular and controversial? What will his legacy be?

Post 1

Kevorkian was so controversial because, at the time physicians assisted suicide wasn’t at the forefront of debate in the public. This wasn’t a new practice, but I don’t believe that it was debated much within the medical community. When Kevorkian went public with his views, the debate then began which resulted in him becoming quite popular and on the other hand, quite controversial. I believe that Kevorkian’s legacy is speaking up for what you truly believe is the right thing to do. Physicians assisted suicide is a widely debated topic and Kevorkian was not afraid to do and say what he believed was right, which is something that not many people do.

post 2

Dr. Jack Kevorkian believed in physician assisted-suicide. He brought this to the forefront. He admitted to helping approximately 130 people to end their lives between 1990 and 1999. He was the strongest proponent in modern history for physician-assisted suicide. He brought much attention to his cause and even sent videotape to CBS 60min showing his assisting in the suicide death of a Lou Gehrig disease patient. Finally, after escaping the authorities for a decade he had four trials all on assisted suicide charges. Three resulted in acquitted trials. After Michigan legislature wrote a law in response to Kevorkian’s assisted suicide and convicted Dr. Kevorkian and he went to jail. He was so bold and outrageous with his fight to legalize physician assisted suicide that in 2010 HBO made a movie about Jack Kevorkian called “ You Don’t Know Jack” which drew a lot of attention and popularity to him. Even though only a few states have legalized physician-assisted suicide, his fight to legalize physician-assisted suicide is his legacy.

Answer the Questions then response to post 1 and 2

What is at stake in terms of religion, ethics and public policies around discussion about right to die decisions? What about when organ donation is involved? How would you make this decision for yourself? A loved one? How should we make decisions and laws about such questions? What factors or parameters influence your decision?

Post 1

The right to die decision can affect many people’s opinions because of the misalignment it has with religion and medical ethics. As physicians, an oath is spoken stating that the care they promise to give to their patients. The debate is looking at whether assisting a patients death can be aligned with that oath. Although organ donation can be a benefit, it would be hard to evaluate if a physician made the right call to end someones life to save someone else’s. The evaulation between “legal” and “illegal” can be quite thin. I do not think I could make this decision for a loved one. In my beliefs, physician assisted suicide is not the answer so it would be hard to have a family member question that. Religion and ethics are major factors in my decision.

post 2

There is much at stake around the right to die. Religious people frown on assisted suicide. Many people think it is ethically wrong and therefore they have put pressure on the law makers to not make assisted suicide legal in most states. Then there are more liberal thinkers who feel that one should have the right to end their life with dignity and not go through enormous pain and suffering. When someone is near death from a accident or etc. most people in the medical field think it is ok to time death in order to harvest the organs. I would not want my death timed by doctors. I personally would want to die naturally. Assisted suicide is a personal decision and the government should not be involved in making this decision. After someone makes the decision about assisted suicide or organ donation, the government would have the responsibility of monitoring the situation to make sure that people bodies would be handled ethically and treated with respect.

Answer the Questions then response to post 1 and 2

If society did embrace right to die policies widely, what kinds of rituals and social roles for the dying could you imagine emerging? In what ways would this change our views and experiences of death?

Post 1

I think one ritual would be some type of “goodbye” party or acknowledgment that the person is choosing to end their life. Right to die policies would change the way people think about death. I believe it will change views on death by giving people more control. People who are terminally ill probably feel out of control. By giving them a choice to end their lives, it gives them some control of lives again.

post 2

If society embraced the right to die policies widely, I could imagine people having very well planned rituals according to the persons who choose to die views. Relatives could prepare by visiting the loved one more, writing poems/letters, cherishing the memoirs, and preparing for their funeral arrangements how they want it. I will always believe that death should be natural, but I could see others believing it could help people prepare for their own death without any fear/anxiety because they are in control of when they are going to die.

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